#roséforatleastpartoftheday

BY: Grace Wexler  @grace_wex   Poderi Cellario E Rosato    What are the grapes ? Nebbiolo and Dolcetto   Where is it from ? The Piedmont in Northern Italy   What method does it use ? Direct Press   Why is it good ? Because it tastes like a sunny afternoon with a cool breeze! Cranberries, unripe strawberry. Tart, focused and freeeeesh!

BY: Grace Wexler

@grace_wex

Poderi Cellario E Rosato

What are the grapes? Nebbiolo and Dolcetto

Where is it from? The Piedmont in Northern Italy

What method does it use? Direct Press

Why is it good? Because it tastes like a sunny afternoon with a cool breeze! Cranberries, unripe strawberry. Tart, focused and freeeeesh!


Idlewild The Flower Flora & Fauna    What are the grapes?  Dolcetto, Barbera, Nebbiolo   Where is it from?  Mendocino, California   What method does it use?  Direct Press   Why is it good?  It’s a juicy refreshing delight! Soft round lush fruit, punctuated by bright, tart, freshness. Structure and bounce!

Idlewild The Flower Flora & Fauna

What are the grapes? Dolcetto, Barbera, Nebbiolo

Where is it from? Mendocino, California

What method does it use? Direct Press

Why is it good? It’s a juicy refreshing delight! Soft round lush fruit, punctuated by bright, tart, freshness. Structure and bounce!


Ok, but what IS Rosé?

We all know rosé is delicious, but what IS it? How is it made? Traditionally There are two ways to make rosé.

Option 1: Direct Press

After grapes are harvested, they’re crushed up and gently pressed, separating the skins from the juice. Wines mostly get their color from the skin of the grape. The direct press method affords the juice just a small amount of time in contact with the skin which is how the blushy pink hue is achieved. The overwhelming majority of rosés you see today and on our shelves at Rebel Rebel are made using this method.

Option 2: Saignée

Saignée method views rosé more as a byproduct of red winemaking than as a singular product that a winemaker sets out to create. “Saignée” comes from the french word that means “to bleed”. In this method some of the juice from fermenting young red wine is bled off/ removed. This juice finishes fermentation separately and becomes rosé. It has had a shorter period of time in contact with the grape skins ( maceration period) so the juice has extracted some color and tannin but not as much as the red wine that remains in contact with the skins as it finishes fermenting. This method also has the added effect of concentrating the juice that will become finished red wine.

Theres also an Option 3 but its not very common.

Option 3 is blending! We’ve all accidentally made rosé in our glass when switching between red and white at the dinner ( or lets be honest lunch) table but, blending red and white wine together on purpose is another way to make pink. In traditional winemaking, the only place where you’ll see this done is Champagne. Champagne houses and vigneron can legally blend Chardonnay with Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. Any other rosé that has a classification/designation however ( AOC, DOC, DOCG, IGP ….you get it) can’t be made pink by blending red and white. Here we have another reason why natural wine can be so extra fun. If you aren’t following the rules to begin with then you can make rosé however the fuck you want! It’s still not as common as seeing rosé from the direct press method from above, even in the natural world, but you will occasionally find a rosé that blends red and white together (Frenchtown Farms “ Cecilia” is a good example of this. This wine blends Syrah with Sauvignon Blanc!).


We have a couple fun rosés on our shelves so come test out your new knowledge when you reach for that pink drink. #onlypinkdrinks2019